Security advice: Can Analogue and HD CCTV work together?

With the debate on the merits of analogue versus High Definition IP cameras showing no sign of going away, it’s understandable that many people are still concerned about installing new High Definition cameras or upgrading existing CCTV systems. HD cameras give great pictures for identification purposes, but are the additional costs worth that benefit? Analogue cameras are now very cost effective but are they the right camera for every situation? It’s worth remembering that whilst High Definition IP (Internet protocol) technology is being exalted as the ultimate in image quality, analogue technology is tried, tested, and still in use by the majority of end users. Analogue CCTV has long delivered acceptable results in the areas of basic staff and visitor surveillance, as well as the reduction of stock shrinkage and the monitoring of specific high risk areas. As a result of which many customers question the need to upgrade their systems to IP when their existing infrastructure supports analogue. So what is the most cost effective solution? High Definition CCTV Identifies One of the benefits of moving over to HD CCTV is that it enables identification, one thing analogue cameras can struggle with. However being pragmatic to the need for businesses to watch their bottom lines in the current economic conditions, it’s also possible to have analogue and High Definition cameras working together on a Hybrid CCTV system. This is where the same recorder can view and record analogue and HD cameras together on the same recorder. So key analogue cameras can be retained for use, with new HD cameras being selected for the more critical areas. Analogue cameras can produce acceptable results where the objective is to recognise people that you already know. In that instance a High Definition camera would produce a level of picture quality which may not be required The cost effective solution? Recording both analogue and High definition cameras on to the same Hybrid recording system can offer the best of both worlds. The use of analogue and IP cameras simultaneously is a tailor-made solution for a country like New Zealand where the small business sector is the dominant market.  SME growth will lead to the natural expansion of properties, warehouses and office space, which will in turn create a gap in existing security installations. A hybrid system, which would likely comprise of an existing CCTV analogue system and infrastructure with new HD IP cameras that would operate through a hybrid DVR, will easily bridge that gap while saving the end user a lot of money, too. Recognition and Identification So for owners of existing analogue systems, whose DVRs need replacing due to functionality problems or insufficient recording space, it can sometimes be  a good idea to opt for a hybrid DVR and retain  some of your existing analogue cameras for recogntion purposes. Then, by adding additional High Definition cameras that produce crisper, higher resolution pictures as a result of the improved technology the sharpness is then available required to help identify strangers and vehicle number plates too. And because IP High Definition quality is constantly being improved, one can look ­forward to the ever-increasing ­quality of facial recognition and other video analytics to assist in identification. In sumary 1.High Definition are the camera of choice where identification is essential. They can even reuse your existing coaxial cable. 2. Cost effective analogue cameras can be used as infill cameras or in areas where recognition as opposed to identification is deemed acceptable 3. Both High Definition and your existing analogue cameras can be connected to the same” hybrid” recorder for live, recorded and off site...

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Security advice: Wireless alarm technology and its benefits to the customer

Wireless alarm technology comes of age Wireless alarm systems  have been used in the security industry for over twenty years, however penetration rates in New Zealand  are still lower than expected. With the way that wireless solutions are embraced in so many other areas of our daily lives, it is hard to see why the security market  is slow to adopt wireless alarm technology. Customers need more information  It has been incorrectly thought that a wireless alarm could possibly be  jammed or interfered with. Additionally,  it was also assumed that they were also much more prone to false  call outs than traditional wired alarms.  Again the perception was that radio waves from any number of sources could interfere with a wireless alarm system and trigger an alert. However, in spite of increased education, the penetration of wireless alarm systems in New Zealand is only around 20%. The benefits of a wireless alarm The benefits of  wireless alarm technology  is exciting.  It’s not always possible to  install cabling in a property due to building or design features. This  can lead to inadequate security alarms being installed, leaving opportunities open for criminals to exploit. Wireless technology offers a flexible alternative that can ensure that a premise is secured as comprehensively as possible. A wireless  solution is particularly useful when it comes to temporary building work. This is often a time when many locations are vulnerable to crime. Instead of leaving premises open to compromise when building work is taking place, wireless detectors attached to temporary partitions or supporting walls can be a very effective way of combating unwelcome intrusion. This would be often impossible using cabling. Battery life is an important area of development  when it comes to  wireless security. Previously wireless detectors used batteries that were expensive to buy, in addition to having a short lifespan. In the residential market in particular, customers look at the total cost of ownership involved in maintaining an alarm system. So constantly replacing expensive batteries had the potential to significantly affect the  purchasing decision. In recent years, detectors have been improved to run on lower-cost and generally available lithium batteries. This now reduces overheads and increases power efficiency, with  3 years battery life easily obtainable. In addition the cost of replacements is significantly less. Another  important feature for personal protection  are panic buttons. In the business world  a discrete wireless panic transmitter can be  clipped to members of staff to safeguard them against attacks.  If the device is activated by the employee, an alarm will sound instantly and the person at risk identified. Wireless panic buttons also have residential appeal, particularly during summer  when more and more outdoor activities are taking place. By keeping a button close to them in the garden, homeowners can ensure they are protected at all times. As panic buttons grow in popularity, so too will increased adoption of wireless alarms. A wireless alarm can complement wired systems In summary, wireless technology is more accessible than ever  for homes and businesses, but should wireless replace traditional wired systems? Ultimately the choice is down to the consumer, but it doesn’t always have to be an either or choice.  It can be  a combination of part wireless alarm, part cabled alarm that  will help ultimately help customers to satisfy even the most complex of security...

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