Security advice: Wireless alarm technology and its benefits to the customer

Wireless alarm technology comes of age

Wireless alarm systems  have been used in the security industry for over twenty years, however penetration rates in New Zealand  are still lower than expected. With the way that wireless solutions are embraced in so many other areas of our daily lives, it is hard to see why the security market  is slow to adopt wireless alarm technology.

Wireless Cell Tower

Customers need more information 

It has been incorrectly thought that a wireless alarm could possibly be  jammed or interfered with. Additionally,  it was also assumed that they were also much more prone to false  call outs than traditional wired alarms.  Again the perception was that radio waves from any number of sources could interfere with a wireless alarm system and trigger an alert.

However, in spite of increased education, the penetration of wireless alarm systems in New Zealand is only around 20%.

The benefits of a wireless alarm

The benefits of  wireless alarm technology  is exciting.  It’s not always possible to  install cabling in a property due to building or design features. This  can lead to inadequate security alarms being installed, leaving opportunities open for criminals to exploit. Wireless technology offers a flexible alternative that can ensure that a premise is secured as comprehensively as possible. A wireless  solution is particularly useful when it comes to temporary building work. This is often a time when many locations are vulnerable to crime. Instead of leaving premises open to compromise when building work is taking place, wireless detectors attached to temporary partitions or supporting walls can be a very effective way of combating unwelcome intrusion. This would be often impossible using cabling.

Battery life is an important area of development  when it comes to  wireless security. Previously wireless detectors used batteries that were expensive to buy, in addition to having a short lifespan. In the residential market in particular, customers look at the total cost of ownership involved in maintaining an alarm system. So constantly replacing expensive batteries had the potential to significantly affect the  purchasing decision. In recent years, detectors have been improved to run on lower-cost and generally available lithium batteries. This now reduces overheads and increases power efficiency, with  3 years battery life easily obtainable. In addition the cost of replacements is significantly less.

Another  important feature for personal protection  are panic buttons. In the business world  a discrete wireless panic transmitter can be  clipped to members of staff to safeguard them against attacks.  If the device is activated by the employee, an alarm will sound instantly and the person at risk identified. Wireless panic buttons also have residential appeal, particularly during summer  when more and more outdoor activities are taking place. By keeping a button close to them in the garden, homeowners can ensure they are protected at all times. As panic buttons grow in popularity, so too will increased adoption of wireless alarms.

A wireless alarm can complement wired systems

In summary, wireless technology is more accessible than ever  for homes and businesses, but should wireless replace traditional wired systems?

Ultimately the choice is down to the consumer, but it doesn’t always have to be an either or choice.  It can be  a combination of part wireless alarm, part cabled alarm that  will help ultimately help customers to satisfy even the most complex of security requirements.