What is the best CCTV camera?

Knowing which is the best CCTV camera to choose can be challenging with so many brands in the marketplace! Names like Panasonic, Bosch, Axis, Hik Vision and Dahua all offer great products however the key is knowing which will offer the best solution for what you want to achieve. To help you select the right camera, here are some things to consider. What do you want to achieve with your CCTV system? It’s surprising that when we meet people who are looking to have CCTV cameras installed we often find that their requirements are quite vague. Before you purchase a camera, we recommend spending some time working out a) What you want to actually see? b) Is it for both day and night? c) Is the footage to be used for training purposes? d) What do you want to do if you see an incident? e) Do you want to prosecute a trespasser or fire a staff member and if so, have you got the right advice and procedures in place? Is night vision important? Outside cameras have their own infra-red lighting to enable footage to be recorded during the night. If there is no lighting, the camera records in black and white so you need to be aware that the pictures won’t be as clear as during the day. This is where it’s important to decide how much you want to invest in technology to get the best results. We recommend you ask to see an example of night time footage before you make a purchase. Where can the cameras be positioned? For identification and vehicle number plates, the camera need to be installed at a height of around 3-4 metres. Sometimes it’s not always possible to get the camera installed in the best position to capture the detail needed. For example, many business cameras are installed far too high and all you end up seeing are the tops of people’s heads. With careful planning, cameras in the workplace can be placed in some good positions so it’s worth taking the time to test out various options. If you’re looking for a CCTV system for your home, the best place to install the camera is under the eaves. This works really well for a single level home however it’s not always ideal with a double story as the camera angle may mean the image is obscured. Again, it’s important to take the time to discuss various places and angles to achieve the best results. How much do you want to spend? The first question to ask is whether you actually need the latest CCTV technology or is it more important to get the best camera that your budget allows? Quite often a lower priced camera can give a more expensive option a good run for its money. Again, ask to see the pictures that the camera produces as that will give you a good indication of the quality. Will I receive after sales service and support? No matter which camera system you choose be sure to check that the company you buy it from provides a good level of service and that the cameras have spare parts available locally. Also ask for some references on similar work they have recently done. All Round Security is an experienced installer of CCTV systems and provider of after sales support services. We provide a range of home and business CCTV systems Auckland wide. If you need help or advice in determining how best to protect your home or business, then please contact us for a free...

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Security advice CCTV – The Insiders Guide To Catching Thieves

CCTV is a big investment right? Systems can cost anything between $5k to $50K but how often does anyone use their CCTV cameras to good effect? “Not often” is the answer. What tends to happen is that the CCTV camera footage is reviewed only  if something is reported missing. So it’s always an “after the event” catch up as opposed to a proactive use of CCTV. And who are the winners of this approach? The people who are stealing your stock and lining their own pockets. Have you ever found a stock item in the wrong part of the shop or factory? Have you wondered why it’s there? It can be that someone  is testing to see if the CCTV cameras are being watched. If no one puts that item back in its correct place then the thief will move it closer and closer to the door over several days, each time proving no one is taking any notice of what’s happening. Then one day it’s taken out through the door and no one is any the wiser. The CCTV system is now proven not to be operational. So how should you use your CCTV system? Here it is, the Insider’s Guide To Catching Thieves With Your CCTV System. The Insider Guide Rule 1. Look at your “live view” CCTV system every day. That’s right, rule 1 is just look at your CCTV system. That’s because most people don’t even do that. It only needs to be for no more 3-4 minutes a day, maybe over a morning coffee, but just use your CCTV system to view what’s going on in your business. The Insider Guide Rule 2. Now that you are looking at your CCTV system every day, then start to look at the recorded footage of things happening at the same time every day. View opening times, closing times, lunch breaks, stock deliveries etc. The important thing is to look at the recorded footage at same recorded time each day for 7 days to see if there is a pattern. You only need to view for no longer than for 3-4 minutes a day, everyday. The Insider Guide Rule 3. Look at the same recorded footage from last week or last month to see if the same things are happening. Sometimes there is a pattern and sometimes there isn’t. Your particular way of working will flag up your concerns at what you may see. The Insider Guide Rule 4. Get your staff involved in reporting suspicious activity on the shop floor back to you, together with a time it happened. With your staff involved it means there is far more chance of finding out what’s happening as there are more pairs of eyes helping you look. Plus a reported incident means you now have something confirmed to look for. The Insider guide Rule 5. Feedback, feedback feedback. When you are given an incident time to look up make sure you give  the person who gave you the incident feedback on the action you have taken. Even if you see nothing of concern, by telling your staff member you reinforce the fact that you are looking at the cameras, and word soon gets round. Incidents aside, it’s always easier to find a member of staff doing something good than  it is to catch them doing something not so good. When you do see some thing good happening use every opportunity to tell people you “appreciate their efforts and to keep up the good work”. This does two things. It gives positive reinforcement, and also lets them know you are using the CCTV system to maintain standards. It is also saying...

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Security advice: CCTV Cameras Should you lease or buy?

  It’s quite surprising how adverse many NZ businesses are to leasing their CCTV cameras.  Very often businesses would rather go without having the benefit of a CCTV system, stating they can’t afford it but at the same time not considering the advantages of a monthly lease option. On their website   http://flexirent.flexigroup.co.nz/   Flexigroup give the following advantages to consider when looking at a lease option. Operating Lease ( CCTV Cameras ) For technology that has up to three years useful life. The flexibility to update to new equipment during the rental term. Tax deductible for business use. Off balance sheet monthly expense. Lease-To-Own ( Alarm system and card access and intercom systems) For equipment the customer will use for more than three years with end of term ownership. Spread payments across a longer term for lower monthly outgoings. Capital/savings are conserved for more worthwhile purposes. So when looking at CCTV cameras it’s very similar to computers or smartphones in that the next generation of technology is often only months way, so Flexigroup advise “why buy what depreciates?” As an example a $10,000 plus GST CCTV system would give you a monthly figure of $356 plus GST to repay.  In effect you pay $78 per month additional to the CCTV purchase price in interest but then again you have only laid out $356 plus GST and you have a$10,000 cameras system working for you. The question to ask is how and where could you invest the remaining $9,644 plus GST left in your bank account to better effect, an investment like marketing that could earn your business more than $78? If you can see how that can help your business than a lease plan makes sense for you. If you would like to discuss this further then please give me a call, Philip on 0800...

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Security advice: Can Analogue and HD CCTV work together?

With the debate on the merits of analogue versus High Definition IP cameras showing no sign of going away, it’s understandable that many people are still concerned about installing new High Definition cameras or upgrading existing CCTV systems. HD cameras give great pictures for identification purposes, but are the additional costs worth that benefit? Analogue cameras are now very cost effective but are they the right camera for every situation? It’s worth remembering that whilst High Definition IP (Internet protocol) technology is being exalted as the ultimate in image quality, analogue technology is tried, tested, and still in use by the majority of end users. Analogue CCTV has long delivered acceptable results in the areas of basic staff and visitor surveillance, as well as the reduction of stock shrinkage and the monitoring of specific high risk areas. As a result of which many customers question the need to upgrade their systems to IP when their existing infrastructure supports analogue. So what is the most cost effective solution? High Definition CCTV Identifies One of the benefits of moving over to HD CCTV is that it enables identification, one thing analogue cameras can struggle with. However being pragmatic to the need for businesses to watch their bottom lines in the current economic conditions, it’s also possible to have analogue and High Definition cameras working together on a Hybrid CCTV system. This is where the same recorder can view and record analogue and HD cameras together on the same recorder. So key analogue cameras can be retained for use, with new HD cameras being selected for the more critical areas. Analogue cameras can produce acceptable results where the objective is to recognise people that you already know. In that instance a High Definition camera would produce a level of picture quality which may not be required The cost effective solution? Recording both analogue and High definition cameras on to the same Hybrid recording system can offer the best of both worlds. The use of analogue and IP cameras simultaneously is a tailor-made solution for a country like New Zealand where the small business sector is the dominant market.  SME growth will lead to the natural expansion of properties, warehouses and office space, which will in turn create a gap in existing security installations. A hybrid system, which would likely comprise of an existing CCTV analogue system and infrastructure with new HD IP cameras that would operate through a hybrid DVR, will easily bridge that gap while saving the end user a lot of money, too. Recognition and Identification So for owners of existing analogue systems, whose DVRs need replacing due to functionality problems or insufficient recording space, it can sometimes be  a good idea to opt for a hybrid DVR and retain  some of your existing analogue cameras for recogntion purposes. Then, by adding additional High Definition cameras that produce crisper, higher resolution pictures as a result of the improved technology the sharpness is then available required to help identify strangers and vehicle number plates too. And because IP High Definition quality is constantly being improved, one can look ­forward to the ever-increasing ­quality of facial recognition and other video analytics to assist in identification. In sumary 1.High Definition are the camera of choice where identification is essential. They can even reuse your existing coaxial cable. 2. Cost effective analogue cameras can be used as infill cameras or in areas where recognition as opposed to identification is deemed acceptable 3. Both High Definition and your existing analogue cameras can be connected to the same” hybrid” recorder for live, recorded and off site...

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Case Study: CCTV Technology Saves Business Security Costs

Smart Thinking for Challenging Security Needs So here was the challenge. A compound full of attractive high value vehicles had to be protected. The client’s premises are on a main road, on a corner opposite a public reserve. Across the road was a gang house and the gang had been active in the area for a while. Protect an Open Compound The area to protect was approximately 100 metres long by 50 metres wide and had a fence approximately 1.5 metres high on two sides with residential homes on the other two sides. The client had been spending over $100,000 per annum on having a business security guard on site 12 hours a day 7 days a week. There was a caravan onsite and the guard toured the compound regularly and then spent the remaining time observing the compound through the night. Show that Good Security Doesn’t Cost – It Pays! The client was keen to reduce the 100k annual security spend and so have been getting proposals from other guarding companies that dispensed with the guard on site but had a mobile patrol attend the site at least 10 times per night to check all was well. The annual ongoing cost? $70,000pa! The task was to see if that $70,000 could be reduced without reducing the business security cover. The answer was in the use of technology as opposed to man power. Personalised Security using Latest Technology A site survey and measurement showed the compound could be virtually covered 100% by CCTV night vision cameras. The cameras had to be site no more than three meters high so as to be able to give clear facial recognition. Most CCTV cameras are sited far too high but the 3 metre height gave great pictures. Additionally point to point infra red beams surrounded the site meaning any one who entered the compound after hours generated a silent alarm call to the monitoring station. The monitoring operators immediately looked at the CCTV cameras online and could view all of the cameras live from the monitoring station. The agreement was if any one at all was seen in the compound at night, no matter who they were, a security guard was sent immediately to the site. Exceptional Result for Client – Value and Security! The remote viewing CCTV system and external beam set gave constant electronic protection to the compound all through the night and in three years there has never been any one illegally entering the site. But the customers greatest satisfaction was that the whole system cost $35,000 as a one off cost, and just $2,500 per annum in quarterly preventive maintenance visits. Smart use of technology paid off both from a business security perspective as well as a good Return On Investment case as well.   For more information and a FREE site assessment Enquire...

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Case Study: Wireless Security and Outdoor Detection

Wireless Security Catches Surprise Thief A national power company was having considerable issues preventing the theft of copper from the bases of electrical pylons in a public reserve. On regular occasions during the day and the night the copper earthing strips were being hacked off the pylons. The concern was not only the loss of the earthing strips but that the thieves were putting not only themselves at risk of electrocution but also there was the real danger that household appliances could also become dangerous in peoples homes. The boldness of the attacks was evident as the pylons were outside the substation compound and therefore vulnerable to these attacks. This also meant that any security equipment fitted to the pylons could be damaged or vandalised during a theft and so prevent any alarm from activating. Furthermore there was no telephone or internet connection available as the whole substation was in the middle of a public reserve. This prevented the standard range of equipment unable to signal for help. Wireless Security Technology the Answer Because of these issues it was decide to utilise the latest in wireless technology detectors. It was impossible to see the device in situ and therefore vandalism concerns were no longer an issue. The wireless security detector had the advantage of being small and discreet and needed no cabling. With a range of 300m to the wireless receiver, sited inside the compound, each device was fitted inside the protective cowling of the copper strip. If the cowling was removed, in trying to attack the copper earthing strip, this activated the wireless device. The next problem to resolve was how to get an alarm signal to a monitoring centre as there were no phone lines available. A high security transmitter was utilised which signalled over a wireless transmission system to be able to alert the monitoring centre. This also was able to carry out a self check to ensure any network failure alerted the monitoring centre. The system was commissioned and tested and handed over to the client to enable them to protect the site. Success in 7 Days Within seven days the first activation of the wireless security system occurred and a security guard was sent to site at around 10 am one weekday morning. What they discovered was an associated contractor of the client attempting to cut the copper strips from the pylons. The Police were called and the contractor taken to the Police Station. Ongoing Satisfaction The wireless system has been installed for nearly three years now and in that time there has never been another attempted theft of the copper strips. The system has proved highly reliable and has never generated a false call. Wireless alarm technology can often offer a solution to a problem when standard equipment has no options. It’s well worth considering. For more information and a free client assessment Click...

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