Security Blog

What is the best CCTV camera?

Posted by on Aug 8, 2016 in CCTV | 0 comments

Knowing which is the best CCTV camera to choose can be challenging with so many brands in the marketplace! Names like Panasonic, Bosch, Axis, Hik Vision and Dahua all offer great products however the key is knowing which will offer the best solution for what you want to achieve. To help you select the right camera, here are some things to consider. What do you want to achieve with your CCTV system? It’s surprising that when we meet people who are looking to have CCTV cameras installed we often find that their requirements are quite vague. Before you purchase a camera, we recommend spending some time working out a) What you want to actually see? b) Is it for both day and night? c) Is the footage to be used for training purposes? d) What do you want to do if you see an incident? e) Do you want to prosecute a trespasser or fire a staff member and if so, have you got the right advice and procedures in place? Is night vision important? Outside cameras have their own infra-red lighting to enable footage to be recorded during the night. If there is no lighting, the camera records in black and white so you need to be aware that the pictures won’t be as clear as during the day. This is where it’s important to decide how much you want to invest in technology to get the best results. We recommend you ask to see an example of night time footage before you make a purchase. Where can the cameras be positioned? For identification and vehicle number plates, the camera need to be installed at a height of around 3-4 metres. Sometimes it’s not always possible to get the camera installed in the best position to capture the detail needed. For example, many business cameras are installed far too high and all you end up seeing are the tops of people’s heads. With careful planning, cameras in the workplace can be placed in some good positions so it’s worth taking the time to test out various options. If you’re looking for a CCTV system for your home, the best place to install the camera is under the eaves. This works really well for a single level home however it’s not always ideal with a double story as the camera angle may mean the image is obscured. Again, it’s important to take the time to discuss various places and angles to achieve the best results. How much do you want to spend? The first question to ask is whether you actually need the latest CCTV technology or is it more important to get the best camera that your budget allows? Quite often a lower priced camera can give a more expensive option a good run for its money. Again, ask to see the pictures that the camera produces as that will give you a good indication of the quality. Will I receive after sales service and support? No matter which camera system you choose be sure to check that the company you buy it from provides a good level of service and that the cameras have spare parts available locally. Also ask for some references on similar work they have recently done. All Round Security is an experienced installer...

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Security advice CCTV – The Insiders Guide To Catching Thieves

Posted by on Jan 2, 2016 in Case Studies, CCTV, Latest Security News | 0 comments

Security advice CCTV – The Insiders Guide To Catching Thieves

CCTV is a big investment right? Systems can cost anything between $5k to $50K but how often does anyone use their CCTV cameras to good effect? “Not often” is the answer. What tends to happen is that the CCTV camera footage is reviewed only  if something is reported missing. So it’s always an “after the event” catch up as opposed to a proactive use of CCTV. And who are the winners of this approach? The people who are stealing your stock and lining their own pockets. Have you ever found a stock item in the wrong part of the shop or factory? Have you wondered why it’s there? It can be that someone  is testing to see if the CCTV cameras are being watched. If no one puts that item back in its correct place then the thief will move it closer and closer to the door over several days, each time proving no one is taking any notice of what’s happening. Then one day it’s taken out through the door and no one is any the wiser. The CCTV system is now proven not to be operational. So how should you use your CCTV system? Here it is, the Insider’s Guide To Catching Thieves With Your CCTV System. The Insider Guide Rule 1. Look at your “live view” CCTV system every day. That’s right, rule 1 is just look at your CCTV system. That’s because most people don’t even do that. It only needs to be for no more 3-4 minutes a day, maybe over a morning coffee, but just use your CCTV system to view what’s going on in your business. The Insider Guide Rule 2. Now that you are looking at your CCTV system every day, then start to look at the recorded footage of things happening at the same time every day. View opening times, closing times, lunch breaks, stock deliveries etc. The important thing is to look at the recorded footage at same recorded time each day for 7 days to see if there is a pattern. You only need to view for no longer than for 3-4 minutes a day, everyday. The Insider Guide Rule 3. Look at the same recorded footage from last week or last month to see if the same things are happening. Sometimes there is a pattern and sometimes there isn’t. Your particular way of working will flag up your concerns at what you may see. The Insider Guide Rule 4. Get your staff involved in reporting suspicious activity on the shop floor back to you, together with a time it happened. With your staff involved it means there is far more chance of finding out what’s happening as there are more pairs of eyes helping you look. Plus a reported incident means you now have something confirmed to look for. The Insider guide Rule 5. Feedback, feedback feedback. When you are given an incident time to look up make sure you give  the person who gave you the incident feedback on the action you have taken. Even if you see nothing of concern, by telling your staff member you reinforce the fact that you are looking at the cameras, and word soon gets round. Incidents aside, it’s always easier to find a member of staff doing something good than  it is to catch them doing something not so good. When...

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Security advice: CCTV Cameras Should you lease or buy?

Posted by on Nov 8, 2015 in CCTV, Latest Security News | 0 comments

Security advice: CCTV Cameras Should you lease or buy?

  It’s quite surprising how adverse many NZ businesses are to leasing their CCTV cameras.  Very often businesses would rather go without having the benefit of a CCTV system, stating they can’t afford it but at the same time not considering the advantages of a monthly lease option. On their website   http://flexirent.flexigroup.co.nz/   Flexigroup give the following advantages to consider when looking at a lease option. Operating Lease ( CCTV Cameras ) For technology that has up to three years useful life. The flexibility to update to new equipment during the rental term. Tax deductible for business use. Off balance sheet monthly expense. Lease-To-Own ( Alarm system and card access and intercom systems) For equipment the customer will use for more than three years with end of term ownership. Spread payments across a longer term for lower monthly outgoings. Capital/savings are conserved for more worthwhile purposes. So when looking at CCTV cameras it’s very similar to computers or smartphones in that the next generation of technology is often only months way, so Flexigroup advise “why buy what depreciates?” As an example a $10,000 plus GST CCTV system would give you a monthly figure of $356 plus GST to repay.  In effect you pay $78 per month additional to the CCTV purchase price in interest but then again you have only laid out $356 plus GST and you have a$10,000 cameras system working for you. The question to ask is how and where could you invest the remaining $9,644 plus GST left in your bank account to better effect, an investment like marketing that could earn your business more than $78? If you can see how that can help your business than a lease plan makes sense for you. If you would like to discuss this further then please give me a call, Philip on 0800...

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Security advice: Can Analogue and HD CCTV work together?

Posted by on Dec 16, 2013 in CCTV, Latest Security News | 0 comments

Security advice: Can Analogue and HD CCTV work together?

With the debate on the merits of analogue versus High Definition IP cameras showing no sign of going away, it’s understandable that many people are still concerned about installing new High Definition cameras or upgrading existing CCTV systems. HD cameras give great pictures for identification purposes, but are the additional costs worth that benefit? Analogue cameras are now very cost effective but are they the right camera for every situation? It’s worth remembering that whilst High Definition IP (Internet protocol) technology is being exalted as the ultimate in image quality, analogue technology is tried, tested, and still in use by the majority of end users. Analogue CCTV has long delivered acceptable results in the areas of basic staff and visitor surveillance, as well as the reduction of stock shrinkage and the monitoring of specific high risk areas. As a result of which many customers question the need to upgrade their systems to IP when their existing infrastructure supports analogue. So what is the most cost effective solution? High Definition CCTV Identifies One of the benefits of moving over to HD CCTV is that it enables identification, one thing analogue cameras can struggle with. However being pragmatic to the need for businesses to watch their bottom lines in the current economic conditions, it’s also possible to have analogue and High Definition cameras working together on a Hybrid CCTV system. This is where the same recorder can view and record analogue and HD cameras together on the same recorder. So key analogue cameras can be retained for use, with new HD cameras being selected for the more critical areas. Analogue cameras can produce acceptable results where the objective is to recognise people that you already know. In that instance a High Definition camera would produce a level of picture quality which may not be required The cost effective solution? Recording both analogue and High definition cameras on to the same Hybrid recording system can offer the best of both worlds. The use of analogue and IP cameras simultaneously is a tailor-made solution for a country like New Zealand where the small business sector is the dominant market.  SME growth will lead to the natural expansion of properties, warehouses and office space, which will in turn create a gap in existing security installations. A hybrid system, which would likely comprise of an existing CCTV analogue system and infrastructure with new HD IP cameras that would operate through a hybrid DVR, will easily bridge that gap while saving the end user a lot of money, too. Recognition and Identification So for owners of existing analogue systems, whose DVRs need replacing due to functionality problems or insufficient recording space, it can sometimes be  a good idea to opt for a hybrid DVR and retain  some of your existing analogue cameras for recogntion purposes. Then, by adding additional High Definition cameras that produce crisper, higher resolution pictures as a result of the improved technology the sharpness is then available required to help identify strangers and vehicle number plates too. And because IP High Definition quality is constantly being improved, one can look ­forward to the ever-increasing ­quality of facial recognition and other video analytics to assist in identification. In sumary 1.High Definition are the camera of choice where identification is essential. They can even reuse...

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Security advice: Wireless alarm technology and its benefits to the customer

Posted by on Dec 2, 2013 in Alarm Systems, Case Studies, Wireless | 0 comments

Security advice: Wireless alarm technology and its benefits to the customer

Wireless alarm technology comes of age Wireless alarm systems  have been used in the security industry for over twenty years, however penetration rates in New Zealand  are still lower than expected. With the way that wireless solutions are embraced in so many other areas of our daily lives, it is hard to see why the security market  is slow to adopt wireless alarm technology. Customers need more information  It has been incorrectly thought that a wireless alarm could possibly be  jammed or interfered with. Additionally,  it was also assumed that they were also much more prone to false  call outs than traditional wired alarms.  Again the perception was that radio waves from any number of sources could interfere with a wireless alarm system and trigger an alert. However, in spite of increased education, the penetration of wireless alarm systems in New Zealand is only around 20%. The benefits of a wireless alarm The benefits of  wireless alarm technology  is exciting.  It’s not always possible to  install cabling in a property due to building or design features. This  can lead to inadequate security alarms being installed, leaving opportunities open for criminals to exploit. Wireless technology offers a flexible alternative that can ensure that a premise is secured as comprehensively as possible. A wireless  solution is particularly useful when it comes to temporary building work. This is often a time when many locations are vulnerable to crime. Instead of leaving premises open to compromise when building work is taking place, wireless detectors attached to temporary partitions or supporting walls can be a very effective way of combating unwelcome intrusion. This would be often impossible using cabling. Battery life is an important area of development  when it comes to  wireless security. Previously wireless detectors used batteries that were expensive to buy, in addition to having a short lifespan. In the residential market in particular, customers look at the total cost of ownership involved in maintaining an alarm system. So constantly replacing expensive batteries had the potential to significantly affect the  purchasing decision. In recent years, detectors have been improved to run on lower-cost and generally available lithium batteries. This now reduces overheads and increases power efficiency, with  3 years battery life easily obtainable. In addition the cost of replacements is significantly less. Another  important feature for personal protection  are panic buttons. In the business world  a discrete wireless panic transmitter can be  clipped to members of staff to safeguard them against attacks.  If the device is activated by the employee, an alarm will sound instantly and the person at risk identified. Wireless panic buttons also have residential appeal, particularly during summer  when more and more outdoor activities are taking place. By keeping a button close to them in the garden, homeowners can ensure they are protected at all times. As panic buttons grow in popularity, so too will increased adoption of wireless alarms. A wireless alarm can complement wired systems In summary, wireless technology is more accessible than ever  for homes and businesses, but should wireless replace traditional wired systems? Ultimately the choice is down to the consumer, but it doesn’t always have to be an either or choice.  It can be  a combination of part wireless alarm, part cabled alarm that  will help ultimately help customers to satisfy even the most complex...

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